Tag Archives: Freelancer

Big Yourself Up! How giving stuff away will have new clients flocking in your direction, make you look awesome, and give you a nice happy feeling inside. Or, self-promotion for freelancers.

recite-19714--1483687329-1e42zxtThere is a lot to be said for providing valuable content, skills or expertise online for free. Offering useful information demonstrates that you know what you are talking about, it helps to show people you can be trusted, and it gives you an opportunity to get your name ‘out there’.

It’s one of the reasons I make a freelance writing podcast – it helps to establish in potential clients’ minds that I’m knowledgeable and skilled in my field. Similarly, the writing I have volunteered for non-profit websites shows editors and clients my writing style and the topics I specialise in writing about. It has also increased my profile, all of which contributes to me getting work on a daily and weekly basis.

Giving stuff away for free is usually good; working for free is usually bad. Work out your limits

Giving things away is not the same as working for free – something that should, in most cases, be avoided at all costs. You don’t want to put yourself in a position where you are being exploited or taken advantage of. Instead, giving things away puts the power in your hands: you choose the information, or the value, that you will provide and you offer it openly. Image of en:Stephen Fry

In this TEDx video, Simon Wheatley talks about how he got web design work from the likes of Stephen Fry and the Rolling Stones based on his reputation as someone who  was “good at WordPress”. That reputation came from having developed plug-ins and contributed to the overall open source nature of the WordPress project. It’s a great talk to listen to and could provide some great ideas for freelancers who are considering adding more content to their sites or service offerings.

In the interests of full disclosure, Simon is my brother-in-law as well as being a top WordPress dude.

 

Podcast Episode 16: How to Avoid Letting Things Slide

We ran out of storage space for our earliest episodes. But fear not, we have made these many, many hours of freelance writing goodness available for just £10. If you want access to them all, please click Add to Cart and buy through our e-junkie account for instant access.

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When you’ve got a lot on your plate, it’s easy to discount the bits that seem less urgent. However, letting the day-to-day management of your freelance writing business slide is a recipe for disaster, so in this episode of A Little Bird Told Me, Lorrie and I discuss the aspects of freelancing that you need to keep on top of, as well as tips and tricks about how to do this. As if that wasn’t enough, we have a interview with Sally Bramley, an Occupational Therapist who has some wise words about keeping motivated and accountable in self-employment.

Show Notes

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The Relentless Marketing of a Freelance Writer

Promotion brainstorm

Promotion brainstorm (Photo credit: tamurray5)

Before I became a full-time, self-employed freelance writer I read a lot on the subject. I wanted to feel prepared and not have any nasty surprises, so I consumed as much information as I could find in advance.

One thing that I read again and again was that, as a freelancer, you have to be constantly marketing yourself but for some reason the reality of this didn’t sink in. I was building myself a website – that was marketing, right? And I could email companies to see if they needed a writer, so that was my marketing covered. Or so I thought.

What transpired was that what I had read was right and my vague plans were severely lacking.

I had planned to find some of my work on various freelancing websites, but that was before I saw that the fees that most of them pay is, frankly, insulting. This meant that I was even more in desperate need to market myself.

The fact is that having a website is not enough, and sending the odd email to a company on spec will mostly result in very few responses, and even fewer actual work commissions. Instead, you need a consistent, targeted marketing plan because, otherwise, nobody knows you exist.

The key to success as a freelance writer is to build good relationships with various clients: some of them will place repeat orders while others just need one piece of work such as a website rewrite. I started to target very specific companies in one of my specialist niches and I also later started to target businesses local to me. I did this by a carefully designed email campaign, and postcards specific to the audience I was aiming for. I also started attending networking events to meet other business owners in person.

As a typical self-effacing Brit, I found it rather mortifying to promote myself in such a blatant way. It helps to think of it as marketing the business rather than myself, but it still makes me cringe.

Even when work comes in and you are busy, if you do not keep the marketing going you will find yourself short of work again in a couple of weeks. It is no exaggeration to say that it is relentless, and sometimes it feels utterly pointless as well. Other times, inexplicably, the same approach pays dividends and enquiries flood in.

Marketing your services as a freelancer can feel very much like throwing 100 balls into the air and trying to guess which two will be caught. I am sure that, over time, I will be able to throw fewer and get more catches but so many factors come into play that it feels impossible to tell. Who was it who said, “Half of my advertising budget is wasted, I just don’t know which half”?

If you are planning to start a career as a freelance copywriter, do not underestimate the effort and energy you will need to put into promoting yourself and your work. A website is key, but on its own it does very little. Think of creative ways to make people aware of what you can offer them. Next, do those things and repeat the ones that are successful. And repeat. And repeat. And repeat.

This post originally appeared as a guest blog post at the Copywriting Apprentice